Mother’s on the Move

MOUNTAIN MEDITATION

MAY 10, 2018

Mothers on the move

By Marguerite Jill Dye

After a big family Mother’s Day Dinner,
Mom started to scrub lots of Corning.
Said the children, “It’s your day. You shouldn’t wash dishes!
Just rinse, and do them in the morning.”
From “A Smile, a Chuckle, or a Loud Guffaw or What Happened When I Wasn’t Looking?”

This poem in Mom’s book of humorous poems about senior citizens always brings a laugh because, I’m afraid, it’s universally true.

Mother’s Day makes me think of my mother, whose legacy is longlasting: a brilliant woman with a ready laugh, whose (rather scandalous) jokes, hilarious poems, and music always livened things up. She was strong and courageous, with a trace of pioneer blood. Roughing it in Vermont while building Dad’s dream lodge was more a nightmare for Mom, but she jumped right in with diligence and zeal, and fully rose to the occasion. In work clothes from head to toe, you wouldn’t have guessed she descended from the kings of France. She was a lady in all of her senses, and a perfectionist with high expectations – not always easy to live up to for my brothers and me. But she also inspired many people who knew her, in music, writing, and the fine art of living. Her enthusiasm and bright ideas were in sync with her great joie de vivre. She was a student of Norman Vincent Peale and believed in the power of positive thinking.

Too many live without adequate care, in unsafe, deplorable conditions. We can help a child we know or through programs like Guardian ad Litem to advocate for and protect a child in court. Our action is also most desperately needed in caring for Mother Earth.

As my husband and I participate all May in Walk Your AS Off, we’re especially aware of the chasm between man’s progress and the preservation of nature. Toxins and chemicals released in the air, spewed into water and soil, from digging, drilling, dumping, and burning, have undermined, not only our health, but also our Earth Mother.

Immune system damage is spiraling out of control: there are nearly 100 autoimmune disorders and diseases such as ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and related forms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), multiple sclerosis (MS), lupus, and diabetes. On average, AS patients alone spend 10 years searching for a diagnosis! Those lost years without proper treatment can cause irreversible spinal damage. As health regulations to protect our wellbeing are being defunded and undone, a greater number of people will fall ill.

Once we’ve experienced immobility, we no longer take walking for granted. Walking and stretching, with doctor’s approval, can help chronic pain and limited motion.

By increasing the distance in steps each day, we’re becoming firmer and fitter. We want to lose a few pounds on our waists, to decreasebody mass index (BMI) and to make ankylosing spondilitis better known. Let’s walk for those unable to. Join a team at walkyourasoff.com or walkasone.org. Happy Mother’s Day, one and all!

Marguerite Jill Dye is an artist and writer who divides her time between the Green Mountains of Vermont and Florida’s Gulf Coast.

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Let’s Go for a Walk!

MOUNTAIN MEDITATION

MAY 3, 2018

Let’s go for a walk!

A little poem I wrote in my 20s still holds true today:
A Walk, Just a Walk
A walk, just a walk, without destination, not hampered by unhappiness, or pressured by time.
A walk, just a walk, that exercised thought, shared a smile, and amused a pup.
A walk, just a walk, that awakened memory, revealed reality, and nourished budding dream.
A walk, just a walk.

By Marguerite Jill Dye

Hippocrates, the Greek physician widely regarded as the “father of medicine,” was right: “Walking is man’s best medicine.”

Walking is one of the few pleasures in life that is also very good for us. It lowers stress and bad cholesterol, strengthens and enlarges the brain, enhances creativity, and helps to lose weight. Walking tones muscles, including the heart, improves breathing and lung function. It lowers blood pressure and the chance of encountering a stroke or diabetes risk. It increases serotonin (which elevates mood), as well as HDL (good cholesterol). Walking just 21 minutes per day cuts the risk of heart disease by 31 percent and saves over $100 billion in America’s health care costs, according to Harvard Medical School. After age 40, 75 minutes of brisk walking per week extends life expectancy 1.8 years; 150-299 minutes per week adds 3.4 years; 450 minutes of vigorous walking per week adds 4.5 years and up to 7.2 years for those with a healthy body-mass index, according to studies by the U.S. National Cancer Institute (consumer.healthday.com).

Interval walking – alternating between a normal and faster pace a few times during a walk – burns more calories and helps build cardiovascular endurance. A University of Virginia women’s fitness study found that three shorter, fast-paced walks each week burned five times more belly fat than five strolls a week. Another important benefit of high intensity exercise (which includes walking at a fast pace) is that it burns three times more visceral fat – the dangerous fat around vital organs that’s linked to heart disease and diabetes.

Every May for the past seven years my husband Duane and I have joined the Walk Your A.S. Off Walkathon, a virtual walk all over the world. My niece Jennifer Dye Visscher helped create this endeavor, where participants walk wherever they are, improving their own health and raising awareness of a little-known disease that 33 million people suffer from.

Ankylosing spondylitis (A.S.) is so little-known that people spend years without diagnosis or proper treatment. It is a progressive, inflammatory form of arthritis that affects the spine primarily. Movement is essential to help slow the progression.

Should you accept the challenge to Walk Your A.S. Off, you’ll improve your own health while helping others. Join a team or form your own at walkyourasoff.com. Each step you take in the month of May will be tallied with other walkers from across the globe. A pedometer or iPhone health app measures your steps quite easily. Just submit your weekly steps online to add to the global grand step total. Your dog’s steps count too on Team PAWS for Our Cause.

“All truly great thoughts are conceived by walking,” said Friedrich Nietzsche, German philosopher.

There’s nothing quite like taking a walk to change a perspective or create a distraction. Walking is so very versatile. It comes in all speeds and sizes: a tailor-made walk can stretch out the back or lift a human from gloom. An added delight is to walk in Vermont, most certainly a feast for the senses: crusty snow crunching beneath snow boots, splashing spring puddles of mud, soft carpets of moss and purple vetch, and flamboyant fluttering leaves in the fall.

“Above all do not lose your desire to walk every day. I walk myself into a state of well-being and walk away from every illness. I have walked myself into my best thoughts and I know of no thought so burdensome that one can not walk away from it,” said Danish Philosopher Soren Kierkegaard.

Marguerite Jill Dye is an artist and writer who divides her time between the Green Mountains of Vermont and Florida’s Gulf Coast.

Kids Need Vitamin N

MOUNTAIN MEDITATION

APRIL 26, 2018

Kids need Vitamin N

By Marguerite Jill Dye

Climbing a tree is a path to self-discovery. Building a woodland fort is an exercise in creativity. Stepping across a babbling brook develops confidence and brings joy. Our most treasured childhood memories are often from outdoor adventures. While 71 percent of adults played outside as kids, only 21 percent of America’s children regularly play outdoors now. But a child’s time experiencing nature reaps an array of health benefits and provides a life long love, wonder, and awe for our natural world. Nature constantly calls to us in Vermont, where we’re certainly fortunate to be. Just opening the door and venturing outside gives us a dose of “Vitamin N”: Nature!

“Children will be smarter, better able to get along with others, healthier and happier when they have regular opportunities for free and unstructured play in the out-of-doors,” according to the American Medical Association. Even five minutes of “green exercise” improve self-esteem and mental well being, especially in the young. Outdoor free play reduces obesity, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and aggression. It boosts creativity, problem solving skills, and the ability to learn. It increases self-discipline and emotional and psychological well being. Who would have thought, a few years ago, we’d need a reminder that playing in nature promotes a child’s happiness?

“Within the space of a few decades, the way children understand and experience nature has changed radically,” Richard Louv wrote in his bestselling book, “Last Child in the Woods: Saving our Children from Nature Deficit Disorder.” He named the diagnosis that stems from the growing phenomenon. “Today, kids are aware of the global threats to the environment—but their physical contact, their intimacy with nature, is fading … As the young spend less and less of their lives in natural surroundings, their senses narrow, physiologically and psychologically, and this reduces the richness of human experience.”

“Within reasonable limits, children need the freedom to play how they choose, including taking risks,” according to Dr. Mariana Brussoni, a developmental child psychologist. “We are experiencing an unprecedented curtailing of children’s outdoor and risky play that is already impacting children’s health and development. It is up to all of us to help provide children the opportunity to develop those life lessons and skills that are so important in shaping their future; helping them develop a view of the world as a place of possibility, rather than of danger.” OutsidePlay.ca was especially created to help adults gain confidence and skills to let children play outdoors.

Over the last 20 years, children’s relationship with nature has changed dramatically due to the technology of “entertainment media,” organized “constructive” activities, traffic, and “stranger danger”—the fear of abduction. When children are constantly told to “Be careful!” or “Don’t do that!” parents’ and caregivers’ own fears may lead to excessive limitations and overprotection. These can contribute to a child’s lack of self-confidence and a fear of taking risks. According to a study reported in The Guardian, children’s health and development are being negatively affected because they are spending less time in nature in self-initiated, outdoor free play. British weather isn’t known for its sunshine, but 64 percent of Brittish kids played outside less than once a week, 28 percent hadn’t gone for a walk in the country for a year, 21 percent had never visited a farm, and 29 percent never climbed a tree. American kids also play inside more than outside, and much closer to home than they used to. In fact, more childhood accidents are from falls out of bed than from a tree, these days.

Marguerite Jill Dye is an artist and writer who divides her time between the Green Mountains of Vermont and Florida’s Gulf Coast.

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MOUNTAIN MEDITATION

APRIL 26, 2018

Kids need Vitamin N

By Marguerite Jill Dye

Climbing a tree is a path to self-discovery. Building a woodland fort is an exercise in creativity. Stepping across a babbling brook develops confidence and brings joy. Our most treasured childhood memories are often from outdoor adventures. While 71 percent of adults played outside as kids, only 21 percent of America’s children regularly play outdoors now. But a child’s time experiencing nature reaps an array of health benefits and provides a life long love, wonder, and awe for our natural world. Nature constantly calls to us in Vermont, where we’re certainly fortunate to be. Just opening the door and venturing outside gives us a dose of “Vitamin N”: Nature!

“Children will be smarter, better able to get along with others, healthier and happier when they have regular opportunities for free and unstructured play in the out-of-doors,” according to the American Medical Association. Even five minutes of “green exercise” improve self-esteem and mental well being, especially in the young. Outdoor free play reduces obesity, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and aggression. It boosts creativity, problem solving skills, and the ability to learn. It increases self-discipline and emotional and psychological well being. Who would have thought, a few years ago, we’d need a reminder that playing in nature promotes a child’s happiness?

“Within the space of a few decades, the way children understand and experience nature has changed radically,” Richard Louv wrote in his bestselling book, “Last Child in the Woods: Saving our Children from Nature Deficit Disorder.” He named the diagnosis that stems from the growing phenomenon. “Today, kids are aware of the global threats to the environment—but their physical contact, their intimacy with nature, is fading … As the young spend less and less of their lives in natural surroundings, their senses narrow, physiologically and psychologically, and this reduces the richness of human experience.”

“Within reasonable limits, children need the freedom to play how they choose, including taking risks,” according to Dr. Mariana Brussoni, a developmental child psychologist. “We are experiencing an unprecedented curtailing of children’s outdoor and risky play that is already impacting children’s health and development. It is up to all of us to help provide children the opportunity to develop those life lessons and skills that are so important in shaping their future; helping them develop a view of the world as a place of possibility, rather than of danger.” OutsidePlay.ca was especially created to help adults gain confidence and skills to let children play outdoors.

Over the last 20 years, children’s relationship with nature has changed dramatically due to the technology of “entertainment media,” organized “constructive” activities, traffic, and “stranger danger”—the fear of abduction. When children are constantly told to “Be careful!” or “Don’t do that!” parents’ and caregivers’ own fears may lead to excessive limitations and overprotection. These can contribute to a child’s lack of self-confidence and a fear of taking risks. According to a study reported in The Guardian, children’s health and development are being negatively affected because they are spending less time in nature in self-initiated, outdoor free play. British weather isn’t known for its sunshine, but 64 percent of Brittish kids played outside less than once a week, 28 percent hadn’t gone for a walk in the country for a year, 21 percent had never visited a farm, and 29 percent never climbed a tree. American kids also play inside more than outside, and much closer to home than they used to. In fact, more childhood accidents are from falls out of bed than from a tree, these days.

Marguerite Jill Dye is an artist and writer who divides her time between the Green Mountains of Vermont and Florida’s Gulf Coast.

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MOUNTAIN MEDITATION Home > Column > Mountain Meditation > Kids need Vitamin N APRIL 26, 2018 Kids need Vitamin N By Marguerite Jill Dye Climbing a tree is a path to self-discovery. Building a woodland fort is an exercise in creativity. Stepping across a babbling brook develops confidence and brings joy. Our most treasured childhood memories are often from outdoor adventures. While 71 percent of adults played outside as kids, only 21 percent of America’s children regularly play outdoors now. But a child’s time experiencing nature reaps an array of health benefits and provides a life long love, wonder, and awe for our natural world. Nature constantly calls to us in Vermont, where we’re certainly fortunate to be. Just opening the door and venturing outside gives us a dose of “Vitamin N”: Nature! “Children will be smarter, better able to get along with others, healthier and happier when they have regular opportunities for free and unstructured play in the out-of-doors,” according to the American Medical Association. Even five minutes of “green exercise” improve self-esteem and mental well being, especially in the young. Outdoor free play reduces obesity, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and aggression. It boosts creativity, problem solving skills, and the ability to learn. It increases self-discipline and emotional and psychological well being. Who would have thought, a few years ago, we’d need a reminder that playing in nature promotes a child’s happiness? “Within the space of a few decades, the way children understand and experience nature has changed radically,” Richard Louv wrote in his bestselling book, “Last Child in the Woods: Saving our Children from Nature Deficit Disorder.” He named the diagnosis that stems from the growing phenomenon. “Today, kids are aware of the global threats to the environment—but their physical contact, their intimacy with nature, is fading … As the young spend less and less of their lives in natural surroundings, their senses narrow, physiologically and psychologically, and this reduces the richness of human experience.” “Within reasonable limits, children need the freedom to play how they choose, including taking risks,” according to Dr. Mariana Brussoni, a developmental child psychologist. “We are experiencing an unprecedented curtailing of children’s outdoor and risky play that is already impacting children’s health and development. It is up to all of us to help provide children the opportunity to develop those life lessons and skills that are so important in shaping their future; helping them develop a view of the world as a place of possibility, rather than of danger.” OutsidePlay.ca was especially created to help adults gain confidence and skills to let children play outdoors. Over the last 20 years, children’s relationship with nature has changed dramatically due to the technology of “entertainment media,” organized “constructive” activities, traffic, and “stranger danger”—the fear of abduction. When children are constantly told to “Be careful!” or “Don’t do that!” parents’ and caregivers’ own fears may lead to excessive limitations and overprotection. These can contribute to a child’s lack of self-confidence and a fear of taking risks. According to a study reported in The Guardian, children’s health and development are being negatively affected because they are spending less time in nature in self-initiated, outdoor free play. British weather isn’t known for its sunshine, but 64 percent of Brittish kids played outside less than once a week, 28 percent hadn’t gone for a walk in the country for a year, 21 percent had never visited a farm, and 29 percent never climbed a tree. American kids also play inside more than outside, and much closer to home than they used to. In fact, more childhood accidents are from falls out of bed than from a tree, these days. Marguerite Jill Dye is an artist and writer who divides her time between the Green Mountains of Vermont and Florida’s Gulf Coast. CHILDRENKIDSMARGUERITE JILL DYENATUREVITAMIN N SHARE THIS ARTICLE FacebookTweetGoogle +EmailLinkedInPinterestShareThis Leave a Reply Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Name * Email * Website Bluegrass and Latin music up next in Chandler’s “Live & Upstairs“ series Playing outdoors in the 1950s SEARCH MOUNTAIN TIMES NEWSLETTER Sign up below to receive the weekly newsletter, which also includes top trending stories and what all the locals are talking about! Email Address MOST POPULAR NEWS BRIEFS News Briefs: Lakes Region 01 JULY, 2015NO COMMENTS SPORTS The 2014 Spartan Death Race takes endurance athletes on an “exploration” 14 JULY, 20143 COMMENTS FEATURED Rutland group boycotts Mac’s, again: Unsafe work environments and mistreatment of employees is at the heart of the protest 13 AUGUST, 201427 COMMENTS STATE NEWS Lawmakers discuss cost, number of special ed teachers in Vermont 24 FEBRUARY, 2016NO COMMENTS LOCAL NEWS Rutland Regional Planning Commission names Edward Bove as new executive director 20 AUGUST, 2014NO COMMENTS MOUNTAIN TIMES TWITTER 5 days ago Spring party @KillingtonMtn #beast365 @musicofmadaila is rocking the stage! /t.co/ThxyawPQoy 9 days ago Horoscopes for April 18th-24th, 2018 – *|/t.co/uLjAq9IZUS|* /t.co/67skx4C2Pc 9 days ago #Killington town Select Board voted in favor of loaning the golf pro shop @GMNGC $250k to start up season. 9 days ago #killington Select Board voted to contract with Brown Golf Management to manage @GMNGC all 3 board members approved. CATEGORIES Arts, Dining & Entertainment AUDI FIS Ski World Cup Breaking News Ticker Column Editors Picks Events & Activities Explore Killington Featured From the Vault Getaways Horoscope Archives Killington Killington Signature Events Killington TV Lifestyle Lift Lines Archives Local News Mother’s celestial inspirations News Briefs Opinion Previous Edition Archive Show Segments Sports State News Uncategorized NAVIGATION Home Horoscopes Events Calendar Discover Killington Classifieds Opinion Column Lifestyle Contact Us About The Mountain Times FIND US ON FACEBOOK MOUNTAIN TIMES NEWSLETTER Sign up below to receive the weekly newsletter, which also includes top trending stories and what all the locals are talking about! Email Address ABOUT THE MOUNTAIN TIMES The Mountain Times is, and has always been, a family-owned independent newspaper located on Route 4. Founded in 1971, the paper has gone through many transitions, now expanding into web and mobile platforms in addition to its weekly newspaper and semi-annual magazines. – See more at: Here The Mountain Times PO Box 183 (Postal address) 5465 Route 4 (Physical address) Killington, VT 05751 Telephone: (802) 422-2399 Fax: (802) 422-2395 Copyright© The Mountain Times, All Rights Reserved. Website designed and built by Group6 Interactive MOUNTAIN MEDITATION Home > Column > Mountain Meditation > Kids need Vitamin N APRIL 26, 2018 Kids need Vitamin N By Marguerite Jill Dye Climbing a tree is a path to self-discovery. Building a woodland fort is an exercise in creativity. Stepping across a babbling brook develops confidence and brings joy. Our most treasured childhood memories are often from outdoor adventures. While 71 percent of adults played outside as kids, only 21 percent of America’s children regularly play outdoors now. But a child’s time experiencing nature reaps an array of health benefits and provides a life long love, wonder, and awe for our natural world. Nature constantly calls to us in Vermont, where we’re certainly fortunate to be. Just opening the door and venturing outside gives us a dose of “Vitamin N”: Nature! “Children will be smarter, better able to get along with others, healthier and happier when they have regular opportunities for free and unstructured play in the out-of-doors,” according to the American Medical Association. Even five minutes of “green exercise” improve self-esteem and mental well being, especially in the young. Outdoor free play reduces obesity, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and aggression. It boosts creativity, problem solving skills, and the ability to learn. It increases self-discipline and emotional and psychological well being. Who would have thought, a few years ago, we’d need a reminder that playing in nature promotes a child’s happiness? “Within the space of a few decades, the way children understand and experience nature has changed radically,” Richard Louv wrote in his bestselling book, “Last Child in the Woods: Saving our Children from Nature Deficit Disorder.” He named the diagnosis that stems from the growing phenomenon. “Today, kids are aware of the global threats to the environment—but their physical contact, their intimacy with nature, is fading … As the young spend less and less of their lives in natural surroundings, their senses narrow, physiologically and psychologically, and this reduces the richness of human experience.” “Within reasonable limits, children need the freedom to play how they choose, including taking risks,” according to Dr. Mariana Brussoni, a developmental child psychologist. “We are experiencing an unprecedented curtailing of children’s outdoor and risky play that is already impacting children’s health and development. It is up to all of us to help provide children the opportunity to develop those life lessons and skills that are so important in shaping their future; helping them develop a view of the world as a place of possibility, rather than of danger.” OutsidePlay.ca was especially created to help adults gain confidence and skills to let children play outdoors. Over the last 20 years, children’s relationship with nature has changed dramatically due to the technology of “entertainment media,” organized “constructive” activities, traffic, and “stranger danger”—the fear of abduction. When children are constantly told to “Be careful!” or “Don’t do that!” parents’ and caregivers’ own fears may lead to excessive limitations and overprotection. These can contribute to a child’s lack of self-confidence and a fear of taking risks. According to a study reported in The Guardian, children’s health and development are being negatively affected because they are spending less time in nature in self-initiated, outdoor free play. British weather isn’t known for its sunshine, but 64 percent of Brittish kids played outside less than once a week, 28 percent hadn’t gone for a walk in the country for a year, 21 percent had never visited a farm, and 29 percent never climbed a tree. American kids also play inside more than outside, and much closer to home than they used to. In fact, more childhood accidents are from falls out of bed than from a tree, these days. Marguerite Jill Dye is an artist and writer who divides her time between the Green Mountains of Vermont and Florida’s Gulf Coast. CHILDRENKIDSMARGUERITE JILL DYENATUREVITAMIN N SHARE THIS ARTICLE FacebookTweetGoogle +EmailLinkedInPinterestShareThis Leave a Reply Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Name * Email * Website Bluegrass and Latin music up next in Chandler’s “Live & Upstairs“ series Playing outdoors in the 1950s SEARCH MOUNTAIN TIMES NEWSLETTER Sign up below to receive the weekly newsletter, which also includes top trending stories and what all the locals are talking about! Email Address MOST POPULAR NEWS BRIEFS News Briefs: Lakes Region 01 JULY, 2015NO COMMENTS SPORTS The 2014 Spartan Death Race takes endurance athletes on an “exploration” 14 JULY, 20143 COMMENTS FEATURED Rutland group boycotts Mac’s, again: Unsafe work environments and mistreatment of employees is at the heart of the protest 13 AUGUST, 201427 COMMENTS STATE NEWS Lawmakers discuss cost, number of special ed teachers in Vermont 24 FEBRUARY, 2016NO COMMENTS LOCAL NEWS Rutland Regional Planning Commission names Edward Bove as new executive director 20 AUGUST, 2014NO COMMENTS MOUNTAIN TIMES TWITTER 5 days ago Spring party @KillingtonMtn #beast365 @musicofmadaila is rocking the stage! /t.co/ThxyawPQoy 9 days ago Horoscopes for April 18th-24th, 2018 – *|/t.co/uLjAq9IZUS|* /t.co/67skx4C2Pc 9 days ago #Killington town Select Board voted in favor of loaning the golf pro shop @GMNGC $250k to start up season. 9 days ago #killington Select Board voted to contract with Brown Golf Management to manage @GMNGC all 3 board members approved. CATEGORIES Arts, Dining & Entertainment AUDI FIS Ski World Cup Breaking News Ticker Column Editors Picks Events & Activities Explore Killington Featured From the Vault Getaways Horoscope Archives Killington Killington Signature Events Killington TV Lifestyle Lift Lines Archives Local News Mother’s celestial inspirations News Briefs Opinion Previous Edition Archive Show Segments Sports State News Uncategorized NAVIGATION Home Horoscopes Events Calendar Discover Killington Classifieds Opinion Column Lifestyle Contact Us About The Mountain Times FIND US ON FACEBOOK MOUNTAIN TIMES NEWSLETTER Sign up below to receive the weekly newsletter, which also includes top trending stories and what all the locals are talking about! Email Address ABOUT THE MOUNTAIN TIMES The Mountain Times is, and has always been, a family-owned independent newspaper located on Route 4. Founded in 1971, the paper has gone through many transitions, now expanding into web and mobile platforms in addition to its weekly newspaper and semi-annual magazines. – See more at: Here The Mountain Times PO Box 183 (Postal address) 5465 Route 4 (Physical address) Killington, VT 05751 Telephone: (802) 422-2399 Fax: (802) 422-2395 Copyright© The Mountain Times, All Rights Reserved. Website designed and built by Group6 Interactive ShareThis Copy and PasteFocus Retriever4 Shares4Focus Retriever4 Shares4

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MOUNTAIN MEDITATION

APRIL 18, 2018

Plant sociology, communication and our critical interconnection

By Magurite Jill Dye

Thank heavens we live in Vermont, where our connection to nature is ever tangible. However, not all of our countrymen and women benefit from the great out-of-doors. Did you know that the average American spends 93 percent of his or her time indoors—87 percent in buildings and 6 percent in vehicles, and at least eight hours a day with electronic screens, then watching TV to relax? Across the country, for the past 40 years, nature-based recreation has decreased by 35 percent. According to Nicholas Carr, author of “The Shallows,” Americans have become more ill-tempered, aggressive, depressed, distracted, narcissistic, fatter, and less “cognitively nimble.” Little wonder.

In last week’s Mountain Meditation, I presented Clemens Arvay’s hypothesis and book on “The Biophilia Effect,” about the human love for and bond with nature. We explored how terpenes, chemical compounds released by trees, benefit human beings’ health and wellbeing. Terpenes are inhaled and absorbed through forest air from the bioactive particles released from pine needles, leaves, tree trunks, the thick bark of some trees, bushes, shrubs, ferns, mushrooms, and the carpet of leaves.

Japan is taking the scientifically-proven benefits of “forest bathing” very seriously to counteract stress and health crises. Soaking in the therapeutic effects of terpenes through our lungs and skin is encouraged by establishing forest therapy grounds and clubs so people will spend time in nature. Some clubs are forming in the U.S. as well. The entire State of Vermont could be declared a forest bathing sanctuary!

Over 99 percent of humanity’s existence has taken place in natural settings. Yet 54 percent of the world’s population now lives in urban environments, and by 2045, more than 6 billion will live in cities. Our daily lives in the past few years have become inundated with technology, smartphones, social media, and apps, in a constant state of distraction. Many people are more connected with the Worldwide Web than to nature or one another.

In “The Nature Principle: Reconnecting with Life in a Virtual Age,” Richard Louv wrote that “The more high tech we become, the more nature we need,” and evidence that connecting with nature boosts our creativity, mental acuity, health, sense of well-being, economies, communities, and strengthens human bonds. In fact, the more that nature is woven into our communities, the healthier our society will become. “Studying the impact of the natural world on the brain is actually a scandalously new idea. … The Japanese work is essential, a Rosetta Stone. … We have to validate the ideas scientifically, through stress physiology, or we’re still stuck at Walden Pond,” he writes.

Each system in biology requires an exchange of information to stay healthy. The biological, biochemical plant and tree communication system is similar to how the human body’s organs communicate internally. As beneficial as terpenes are for people, their primary role is in the science of plant sociology, the social life of plant communities.

Mycorrhiza is a symbiotic network of plants and fungi that connects tree roots to one another and allows them to communicate messages through chemical exchanges. Trees send terpenes in liquid molecular form to provide nutrition and other compounds to area trees and plants in need. For example, if young trees are lacking certain nutrients, the mother tree can send them. If a tree is attacked by insects, it can send a chemical alert to other area plants and trees to stimulate protective substances that toughen the leaves and make them less appetizing. If a tree is exposed to fire, its warning triggers the emission of a less flammable substance.

We are only now beginning to gain an awareness of the complexity of the forest and to become conscious of our interconnection with nature. Although individuals almost always identify themselves as biophilic nature lovers, our species allows a biophobic psychology of collectives to dominate, attacking and exploiting nature for economic, not ecological, gain.

But according to Arvay, we are eco-psychosomatic beings, formed by and a part of nature. Each attack on the ecosystems is an attack on ourselves. Separation undermines our survival. This is why the critical and promising new scientific field of eco-psychosomatics recognizes the psychological, physical, and ecological connection and unity of the human organism with the natural world.

Marguerite Jill Dye is an artist and writer who divides her time between the Green Mountains of Vermont and Florida’s Gulf Coast.

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MOUNTAIN MEDITATION

APRIL 18, 2018

Plant sociology, communication and our critical interconnection

By Magurite Jill Dye

Thank heavens we live in Vermont, where our connection to nature is ever tangible. However, not all of our countrymen and women benefit from the great out-of-doors. Did you know that the average American spends 93 percent of his or her time indoors—87 percent in buildings and 6 percent in vehicles, and at least eight hours a day with electronic screens, then watching TV to relax? Across the country, for the past 40 years, nature-based recreation has decreased by 35 percent. According to Nicholas Carr, author of “The Shallows,” Americans have become more ill-tempered, aggressive, depressed, distracted, narcissistic, fatter, and less “cognitively nimble.” Little wonder.

In last week’s Mountain Meditation, I presented Clemens Arvay’s hypothesis and book on “The Biophilia Effect,” about the human love for and bond with nature. We explored how terpenes, chemical compounds released by trees, benefit human beings’ health and wellbeing. Terpenes are inhaled and absorbed through forest air from the bioactive particles released from pine needles, leaves, tree trunks, the thick bark of some trees, bushes, shrubs, ferns, mushrooms, and the carpet of leaves.

Japan is taking the scientifically-proven benefits of “forest bathing” very seriously to counteract stress and health crises. Soaking in the therapeutic effects of terpenes through our lungs and skin is encouraged by establishing forest therapy grounds and clubs so people will spend time in nature. Some clubs are forming in the U.S. as well. The entire State of Vermont could be declared a forest bathing sanctuary!

Over 99 percent of humanity’s existence has taken place in natural settings. Yet 54 percent of the world’s population now lives in urban environments, and by 2045, more than 6 billion will live in cities. Our daily lives in the past few years have become inundated with technology, smartphones, social media, and apps, in a constant state of distraction. Many people are more connected with the Worldwide Web than to nature or one another.

In “The Nature Principle: Reconnecting with Life in a Virtual Age,” Richard Louv wrote that “The more high tech we become, the more nature we need,” and evidence that connecting with nature boosts our creativity, mental acuity, health, sense of well-being, economies, communities, and strengthens human bonds. In fact, the more that nature is woven into our communities, the healthier our society will become. “Studying the impact of the natural world on the brain is actually a scandalously new idea. … The Japanese work is essential, a Rosetta Stone. … We have to validate the ideas scientifically, through stress physiology, or we’re still stuck at Walden Pond,” he writes.

Each system in biology requires an exchange of information to stay healthy. The biological, biochemical plant and tree communication system is similar to how the human body’s organs communicate internally. As beneficial as terpenes are for people, their primary role is in the science of plant sociology, the social life of plant communities.

Mycorrhiza is a symbiotic network of plants and fungi that connects tree roots to one another and allows them to communicate messages through chemical exchanges. Trees send terpenes in liquid molecular form to provide nutrition and other compounds to area trees and plants in need. For example, if young trees are lacking certain nutrients, the mother tree can send them. If a tree is attacked by insects, it can send a chemical alert to other area plants and trees to stimulate protective substances that toughen the leaves and make them less appetizing. If a tree is exposed to fire, its warning triggers the emission of a less flammable substance.

We are only now beginning to gain an awareness of the complexity of the forest and to become conscious of our interconnection with nature. Although individuals almost always identify themselves as biophilic nature lovers, our species allows a biophobic psychology of collectives to dominate, attacking and exploiting nature for economic, not ecological, gain.

But according to Arvay, we are eco-psychosomatic beings, formed by and a part of nature. Each attack on the ecosystems is an attack on ourselves. Separation undermines our survival. This is why the critical and promising new scientific field of eco-psychosomatics recognizes the psychological, physical, and ecological connection and unity of the human organism with the natural world.

Marguerite Jill Dye is an artist and writer who divides her time between the Green Mountains of Vermont and Florida’s Gulf Coast.

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APRIL 18, 2018

Plant sociology, communication and our critical interconnection

APRIL 18, 2018 Plant sociology, communication and our critical interconnection

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MOUNTAIN MEDITATION Home > Column > Mountain Meditation > Plant sociology, communication and our critical interconnection APRIL 18, 2018 Plant sociology, communication and our critical interconnection By Magurite Jill Dye Thank heavens we live in Vermont, where our connection to nature is ever tangible. However, not all of our countrymen and women benefit from the great out-of-doors. Did you know that the average American spends 93 percent of his or her time indoors—87 percent in buildings and 6 percent in vehicles, and at least eight hours a day with electronic screens, then watching TV to relax? Across the country, for the past 40 years, nature-based recreation has decreased by 35 percent. According to Nicholas Carr, author of “The Shallows,” Americans have become more ill-tempered, aggressive, depressed, distracted, narcissistic, fatter, and less “cognitively nimble.” Little wonder. In last week’s Mountain Meditation, I presented Clemens Arvay’s hypothesis and book on “The Biophilia Effect,” about the human love for and bond with nature. We explored how terpenes, chemical compounds released by trees, benefit human beings’ health and wellbeing. Terpenes are inhaled and absorbed through forest air from the bioactive particles released from pine needles, leaves, tree trunks, the thick bark of some trees, bushes, shrubs, ferns, mushrooms, and the carpet of leaves. Japan is taking the scientifically-proven benefits of “forest bathing” very seriously to counteract stress and health crises. Soaking in the therapeutic effects of terpenes through our lungs and skin is encouraged by establishing forest therapy grounds and clubs so people will spend time in nature. Some clubs are forming in the U.S. as well. The entire State of Vermont could be declared a forest bathing sanctuary! Over 99 percent of humanity’s existence has taken place in natural settings. Yet 54 percent of the world’s population now lives in urban environments, and by 2045, more than 6 billion will live in cities. Our daily lives in the past few years have become inundated with technology, smartphones, social media, and apps, in a constant state of distraction. Many people are more connected with the Worldwide Web than to nature or one another. In “The Nature Principle: Reconnecting with Life in a Virtual Age,” Richard Louv wrote that “The more high tech we become, the more nature we need,” and evidence that connecting with nature boosts our creativity, mental acuity, health, sense of well-being, economies, communities, and strengthens human bonds. In fact, the more that nature is woven into our communities, the healthier our society will become. “Studying the impact of the natural world on the brain is actually a scandalously new idea. … The Japanese work is essential, a Rosetta Stone. … We have to validate the ideas scientifically, through stress physiology, or we’re still stuck at Walden Pond,” he writes. Each system in biology requires an exchange of information to stay healthy. The biological, biochemical plant and tree communication system is similar to how the human body’s organs communicate internally. As beneficial as terpenes are for people, their primary role is in the science of plant sociology, the social life of plant communities. Mycorrhiza is a symbiotic network of plants and fungi that connects tree roots to one another and allows them to communicate messages through chemical exchanges. Trees send terpenes in liquid molecular form to provide nutrition and other compounds to area trees and plants in need. For example, if young trees are lacking certain nutrients, the mother tree can send them. If a tree is attacked by insects, it can send a chemical alert to other area plants and trees to stimulate protective substances that toughen the leaves and make them less appetizing. If a tree is exposed to fire, its warning triggers the emission of a less flammable substance. We are only now beginning to gain an awareness of the complexity of the forest and to become conscious of our interconnection with nature. Although individuals almost always identify themselves as biophilic nature lovers, our species allows a biophobic psychology of collectives to dominate, attacking and exploiting nature for economic, not ecological, gain. But according to Arvay, we are eco-psychosomatic beings, formed by and a part of nature. Each attack on the ecosystems is an attack on ourselves. Separation undermines our survival. This is why the critical and promising new scientific field of eco-psychosomatics recognizes the psychological, physical, and ecological connection and unity of the human organism with the natural world. Marguerite Jill Dye is an artist and writer who divides her time between the Green Mountains of Vermont and Florida’s Gulf Coast. MAGURITE JILL DYEPLANT SOCIOLOGY SHARE THIS ARTICLE FacebookTweetGoogle +EmailLinkedInPinterestShareThis Leave a Reply Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Name * Email * Website April showers Guns, commonsense, and Vermont’s example SEARCH MOUNTAIN TIMES NEWSLETTER Sign up below to receive the weekly newsletter, which also includes top trending stories and what all the locals are talking about! Email Address MOST POPULAR NEWS BRIEFS News Briefs: Lakes Region 01 JULY, 2015NO COMMENTS SPORTS The 2014 Spartan Death Race takes endurance athletes on an “exploration” 14 JULY, 20141 COMMENT FEATURED Rutland group boycotts Mac’s, again: Unsafe work environments and mistreatment of employees is at the heart of the protest 13 AUGUST, 201427 COMMENTS STATE NEWS Lawmakers discuss cost, number of special ed teachers in Vermont 24 FEBRUARY, 2016NO COMMENTS LOCAL NEWS Rutland Regional Planning Commission names Edward Bove as new executive director 20 AUGUST, 2014NO COMMENTS MOUNTAIN TIMES TWITTER yesterday Horoscopes for April 18th-24th, 2018 – *|/t.co/uLjAq9IZUS|* /t.co/67skx4C2Pc 2 days ago #Killington town Select Board voted in favor of loaning the golf pro shop @GMNGC $250k to start up season. 2 days ago #killington Select Board voted to contract with Brown Golf Management to manage @GMNGC all 3 board members approved. 2 days ago Chet Hagenbarth was just appointed interim town manager #killington for a term not to exceed 6 months, at the Select Board meeting. #vt CATEGORIES Arts, Dining & Entertainment AUDI FIS Ski World Cup Breaking News Ticker Column Editors Picks Events & Activities Explore Killington Featured From the Vault Getaways Horoscope Archives Killington Killington Signature Events Killington TV Lifestyle Lift Lines Archives Local News Mother’s celestial inspirations News Briefs Opinion Previous Edition Archive Show Segments Sports State News Uncategorized NAVIGATION Home Horoscopes Events Calendar Discover Killington Classifieds Opinion Column Lifestyle Contact Us About The Mountain Times FIND US ON FACEBOOK MOUNTAIN TIMES NEWSLETTER Sign up below to receive the weekly newsletter, which also includes top trending stories and what all the locals are talking about! Email Address ABOUT THE MOUNTAIN TIMES The Mountain Times is, and has always been, a family-owned independent newspaper located on Route 4. Founded in 1971, the paper has gone through many transitions, now expanding into web and mobile platforms in addition to its weekly newspaper and semi-annual magazines. – See more at: Here The Mountain Times PO Box 183 (Postal address) 5465 Route 4 (Physical address) Killington, VT 05751 Telephone: (802) 422-2399 Fax: (802) 422-2395 Copyright© The Mountain Times, All Rights Reserved. Website designed and built by Group6 Interactive MOUNTAIN MEDITATION Home > Column > Mountain Meditation > Plant sociology, communication and our critical interconnection APRIL 18, 2018 Plant sociology, communication and our critical interconnection By Magurite Jill Dye Thank heavens we live in Vermont, where our connection to nature is ever tangible. However, not all of our countrymen and women benefit from the great out-of-doors. Did you know that the average American spends 93 percent of his or her time indoors—87 percent in buildings and 6 percent in vehicles, and at least eight hours a day with electronic screens, then watching TV to relax? Across the country, for the past 40 years, nature-based recreation has decreased by 35 percent. According to Nicholas Carr, author of “The Shallows,” Americans have become more ill-tempered, aggressive, depressed, distracted, narcissistic, fatter, and less “cognitively nimble.” Little wonder. In last week’s Mountain Meditation, I presented Clemens Arvay’s hypothesis and book on “The Biophilia Effect,” about the human love for and bond with nature. We explored how terpenes, chemical compounds released by trees, benefit human beings’ health and wellbeing. Terpenes are inhaled and absorbed through forest air from the bioactive particles released from pine needles, leaves, tree trunks, the thick bark of some trees, bushes, shrubs, ferns, mushrooms, and the carpet of leaves. Japan is taking the scientifically-proven benefits of “forest bathing” very seriously to counteract stress and health crises. Soaking in the therapeutic effects of terpenes through our lungs and skin is encouraged by establishing forest therapy grounds and clubs so people will spend time in nature. Some clubs are forming in the U.S. as well. The entire State of Vermont could be declared a forest bathing sanctuary! Over 99 percent of humanity’s existence has taken place in natural settings. Yet 54 percent of the world’s population now lives in urban environments, and by 2045, more than 6 billion will live in cities. Our daily lives in the past few years have become inundated with technology, smartphones, social media, and apps, in a constant state of distraction. Many people are more connected with the Worldwide Web than to nature or one another. In “The Nature Principle: Reconnecting with Life in a Virtual Age,” Richard Louv wrote that “The more high tech we become, the more nature we need,” and evidence that connecting with nature boosts our creativity, mental acuity, health, sense of well-being, economies, communities, and strengthens human bonds. In fact, the more that nature is woven into our communities, the healthier our society will become. “Studying the impact of the natural world on the brain is actually a scandalously new idea. … The Japanese work is essential, a Rosetta Stone. … We have to validate the ideas scientifically, through stress physiology, or we’re still stuck at Walden Pond,” he writes. Each system in biology requires an exchange of information to stay healthy. The biological, biochemical plant and tree communication system is similar to how the human body’s organs communicate internally. As beneficial as terpenes are for people, their primary role is in the science of plant sociology, the social life of plant communities. Mycorrhiza is a symbiotic network of plants and fungi that connects tree roots to one another and allows them to communicate messages through chemical exchanges. Trees send terpenes in liquid molecular form to provide nutrition and other compounds to area trees and plants in need. For example, if young trees are lacking certain nutrients, the mother tree can send them. If a tree is attacked by insects, it can send a chemical alert to other area plants and trees to stimulate protective substances that toughen the leaves and make them less appetizing. If a tree is exposed to fire, its warning triggers the emission of a less flammable substance. We are only now beginning to gain an awareness of the complexity of the forest and to become conscious of our interconnection with nature. Although individuals almost always identify themselves as biophilic nature lovers, our species allows a biophobic psychology of collectives to dominate, attacking and exploiting nature for economic, not ecological, gain. But according to Arvay, we are eco-psychosomatic beings, formed by and a part of nature. Each attack on the ecosystems is an attack on ourselves. Separation undermines our survival. This is why the critical and promising new scientific field of eco-psychosomatics recognizes the psychological, physical, and ecological connection and unity of the human organism with the natural world. Marguerite Jill Dye is an artist and writer who divides her time between the Green Mountains of Vermont and Florida’s Gulf Coast. MAGURITE JILL DYEPLANT SOCIOLOGY SHARE THIS ARTICLE FacebookTweetGoogle +EmailLinkedInPinterestShareThis Leave a Reply Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Name * Email * Website April showers Guns, commonsense, and Vermont’s example SEARCH MOUNTAIN TIMES NEWSLETTER Sign up below to receive the weekly newsletter, which also includes top trending stories and what all the locals are talking about! Email Address MOST POPULAR NEWS BRIEFS News Briefs: Lakes Region 01 JULY, 2015NO COMMENTS SPORTS The 2014 Spartan Death Race takes endurance athletes on an “exploration” 14 JULY, 20141 COMMENT FEATURED Rutland group boycotts Mac’s, again: Unsafe work environments and mistreatment of employees is at the heart of the protest 13 AUGUST, 201427 COMMENTS STATE NEWS Lawmakers discuss cost, number of special ed teachers in Vermont 24 FEBRUARY, 2016NO COMMENTS LOCAL NEWS Rutland Regional Planning Commission names Edward Bove as new executive director 20 AUGUST, 2014NO COMMENTS MOUNTAIN TIMES TWITTER yesterday Horoscopes for April 18th-24th, 2018 – *|/t.co/uLjAq9IZUS|* /t.co/67skx4C2Pc 2 days ago #Killington town Select Board voted in favor of loaning the golf pro shop @GMNGC $250k to start up season. 2 days ago #killington Select Board voted to contract with Brown Golf Management to manage @GMNGC all 3 board members approved. 2 days ago Chet Hagenbarth was just appointed interim town manager #killington for a term not to exceed 6 months, at the Select Board meeting. #vt CATEGORIES Arts, Dining & Entertainment AUDI FIS Ski World Cup Breaking News Ticker Column Editors Picks Events & Activities Explore Killington Featured From the Vault Getaways Horoscope Archives Killington Killington Signature Events Killington TV Lifestyle Lift Lines Archives Local News Mother’s celestial inspirations News Briefs Opinion Previous Edition Archive Show Segments Sports State News Uncategorized NAVIGATION Home Horoscopes Events Calendar Discover Killington Classifieds Opinion Column Lifestyle Contact Us About The Mountain Times FIND US ON FACEBOOK MOUNTAIN TIMES NEWSLETTER Sign up below to receive the weekly newsletter, which also includes top trending stories and what all the locals are talking about! Email Address ABOUT THE MOUNTAIN TIMES The Mountain Times is, and has always been, a family-owned independent newspaper located on Route 4. Founded in 1971, the paper has gone through many transitions, now expanding into web and mobile platforms in addition to its weekly newspaper and semi-annual magazines. – See more at: Here The Mountain Times PO Box 183 (Postal address) 5465 Route 4 (Physical address) Killington, VT 05751 Telephone: (802) 422-2399 Fax: (802) 422-2395 Copyright© The Mountain Times, All Rights Reserved. Website designed and built by Group6 Interactive APRIL 18, 2018 Plant sociology, communication and our critical interconnection APRIL 18, 2018 Plant sociology, communication and our critical interconnectionFocus RetrieverSharesFocus RetrieverShares

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Biophilia: Healing Connection and Love of Nature

APRIL 12, 2018

Biophilia : healing connection and love of nature

Biophilia : healing connection and love of nature

Painting by Magurite Jill Dye

by Magurite Jill Dye

Vermonters and fellow nature lovers know the power our magnificent mountains, forests, and woods have on our wellbeing. If I hadn’t experienced nature’s healing effect myself, I may not have understood the forest’s curative energies on the human immune system.

Years ago, after travels in Turkey and Greece, I arrived in Austria to attend a University of Graz summer program. Austria has always reminded me of Vermont, and Graz is the sister city of my hometown, Montclair, N.J. But I’d taken ill after Istanbul with a very sore throat, high fever, and chills. A kind young mother I met on the tram took me to her home for a traditional cure. After a nap and cups of hot tea, she led me outside into the cool forest. While she and her children picked wild blueberries, I rested under a pine tree. Little did I realize how quickly breathing in the moist forest air would help me heal and regain my strength. But the science became clear when I heard an interview on Sounds True (soundstrue.com) with Austrian biologist Clemens Arvay from the University of Graz.

We are eco-psychosomatic beings, according to Arvay, author of “The Biophilia Effect: A Scientific and Spiritual Exploration of the Healing Bond Between Humans and Nature.” Biophilia is the love of and our interconnectedness with nature. In the 1960s, German-American psychoanalyst Eric Fromm wrote that humans have a biophilic force in our psyche that connects us with other species and creates a desire to be close to nature. He said that our biophilic force creates a flow that keeps us healthy, but when we are disconnected from nature, we become ill.

Since then, Arvay said, much progress has been made in the field. In 2013, studies were published that measured the increase in human immune system function from breathing in terpenes in the forest air. Terpenes are the complex biochemical compounds that are released by trees and plants and that have a healing effect on the human body. They rise dramatically in April and May and peak in June and August. After spending just one day in a forest, the “natural killer cells” in a person’s blood increase by 40 percent and their activity increases too. They work to eliminate bacteria and viruses as an important part of the immune system.

There is also evidence that breathing in terpenes increases anti-cancer proteins perforin, granulysin, and “granzymes,” which attack existing tumor cells and dangerous cells that may lead to cancer. Terpenes not only improve our immune system function but also protect us from heart attacks by increasing the body’s production of DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone), according to Japanese studies published in Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine. A Korean study also found a significant decrease in depression.

Another Japanese study determined that terpenes distributed overnight through vaporizers in hotel rooms also had a therapeutic effect on the body’s immune system, although not to the same degree as exposure to the millions of terpenes in nature.

The Ulrich study in Sweden and Denmark proved that seeing a tree through a hospital window shortened hospital stays and reduced complications and medication (including pain meds). The tree view activates the parasympathetic nervous system of regeneration and growth and the vagus nerve, causing balance and calm. Seeing a photograph or painting of nature or hearing the sounds of nature also have a calming effect that decreases the stress hormone cortisol in the blood.

The opposite is true, as well. Stressful, noisy, city life switches our reptilian brains into fight or flight mode. Seeking out parks and pockets of nature in the city, growing potted trees, house plants, and rooftop gardens, are especially important to provide balance and relief.

This connection between the psychological, physical, and ecological is a new science called ecopsychosomatics. It recognizes the human organism’s interconnectedness with the natural world.

“Forest bathing,” which I introduced in Mountain Meditation last year, is an ancient Chinese healing art called “Senlinyu” that began 2,500 years ago with qi gong and tai chi, to heal and increase “chi” energy. In the 1980s, “Shinrin-yoku” was studied in Japan and has become a popular healing technique.

Next week we’ll further explore ecopsychosomatics and the field of plant sociology, which includes the other main function of terpenes: to enable communication within and between communities of trees.

Marguerite Jill Dye is an artist and writer who divides her time between Vermont and Florida’s Gulf Coast.

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APRIL 12, 2018

Biophilia : healing connection and love of nature

Biophilia : healing connection and love of nature

Painting by Magurite Jill Dye

by Magurite Jill Dye

Vermonters and fellow nature lovers know the power our magnificent mountains, forests, and woods have on our wellbeing. If I hadn’t experienced nature’s healing effect myself, I may not have understood the forest’s curative energies on the human immune system.

Years ago, after travels in Turkey and Greece, I arrived in Austria to attend a University of Graz summer program. Austria has always reminded me of Vermont, and Graz is the sister city of my hometown, Montclair, N.J. But I’d taken ill after Istanbul with a very sore throat, high fever, and chills. A kind young mother I met on the tram took me to her home for a traditional cure. After a nap and cups of hot tea, she led me outside into the cool forest. While she and her children picked wild blueberries, I rested under a pine tree. Little did I realize how quickly breathing in the moist forest air would help me heal and regain my strength. But the science became clear when I heard an interview on Sounds True (soundstrue.com) with Austrian biologist Clemens Arvay from the University of Graz.

We are eco-psychosomatic beings, according to Arvay, author of “The Biophilia Effect: A Scientific and Spiritual Exploration of the Healing Bond Between Humans and Nature.” Biophilia is the love of and our interconnectedness with nature. In the 1960s, German-American psychoanalyst Eric Fromm wrote that humans have a biophilic force in our psyche that connects us with other species and creates a desire to be close to nature. He said that our biophilic force creates a flow that keeps us healthy, but when we are disconnected from nature, we become ill.

Since then, Arvay said, much progress has been made in the field. In 2013, studies were published that measured the increase in human immune system function from breathing in terpenes in the forest air. Terpenes are the complex biochemical compounds that are released by trees and plants and that have a healing effect on the human body. They rise dramatically in April and May and peak in June and August. After spending just one day in a forest, the “natural killer cells” in a person’s blood increase by 40 percent and their activity increases too. They work to eliminate bacteria and viruses as an important part of the immune system.

There is also evidence that breathing in terpenes increases anti-cancer proteins perforin, granulysin, and “granzymes,” which attack existing tumor cells and dangerous cells that may lead to cancer. Terpenes not only improve our immune system function but also protect us from heart attacks by increasing the body’s production of DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone), according to Japanese studies published in Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine. A Korean study also found a significant decrease in depression.

Another Japanese study determined that terpenes distributed overnight through vaporizers in hotel rooms also had a therapeutic effect on the body’s immune system, although not to the same degree as exposure to the millions of terpenes in nature.

The Ulrich study in Sweden and Denmark proved that seeing a tree through a hospital window shortened hospital stays and reduced complications and medication (including pain meds). The tree view activates the parasympathetic nervous system of regeneration and growth and the vagus nerve, causing balance and calm. Seeing a photograph or painting of nature or hearing the sounds of nature also have a calming effect that decreases the stress hormone cortisol in the blood.

The opposite is true, as well. Stressful, noisy, city life switches our reptilian brains into fight or flight mode. Seeking out parks and pockets of nature in the city, growing potted trees, house plants, and rooftop gardens, are especially important to provide balance and relief.

This connection between the psychological, physical, and ecological is a new science called ecopsychosomatics. It recognizes the human organism’s interconnectedness with the natural world.

“Forest bathing,” which I introduced in Mountain Meditation last year, is an ancient Chinese healing art called “Senlinyu” that began 2,500 years ago with qi gong and tai chi, to heal and increase “chi” energy. In the 1980s, “Shinrin-yoku” was studied in Japan and has become a popular healing technique.

Next week we’ll further explore ecopsychosomatics and the field of plant sociology, which includes the other main function of terpenes: to enable communication within and between communities of trees.

Marguerite Jill Dye is an artist and writer who divides her time between Vermont and Florida’s Gulf Coast.

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APRIL 12, 2018 Biophilia : healing connection and love of nature Painting by Magurite Jill Dye by Magurite Jill Dye Vermonters and fellow nature lovers know the power our magnificent mountains, forests, and woods have on our wellbeing. If I hadn’t experienced nature’s healing effect myself, I may not have understood the forest’s curative energies on the human immune system. Years ago, after travels in Turkey and Greece, I arrived in Austria to attend a University of Graz summer program. Austria has always reminded me of Vermont, and Graz is the sister city of my hometown, Montclair, N.J. But I’d taken ill after Istanbul with a very sore throat, high fever, and chills. A kind young mother I met on the tram took me to her home for a traditional cure. After a nap and cups of hot tea, she led me outside into the cool forest. While she and her children picked wild blueberries, I rested under a pine tree. Little did I realize how quickly breathing in the moist forest air would help me heal and regain my strength. But the science became clear when I heard an interview on Sounds True (soundstrue.com) with Austrian biologist Clemens Arvay from the University of Graz. We are eco-psychosomatic beings, according to Arvay, author of “The Biophilia Effect: A Scientific and Spiritual Exploration of the Healing Bond Between Humans and Nature.” Biophilia is the love of and our interconnectedness with nature. In the 1960s, German-American psychoanalyst Eric Fromm wrote that humans have a biophilic force in our psyche that connects us with other species and creates a desire to be close to nature. He said that our biophilic force creates a flow that keeps us healthy, but when we are disconnected from nature, we become ill. Since then, Arvay said, much progress has been made in the field. In 2013, studies were published that measured the increase in human immune system function from breathing in terpenes in the forest air. Terpenes are the complex biochemical compounds that are released by trees and plants and that have a healing effect on the human body. They rise dramatically in April and May and peak in June and August. After spending just one day in a forest, the “natural killer cells” in a person’s blood increase by 40 percent and their activity increases too. They work to eliminate bacteria and viruses as an important part of the immune system. There is also evidence that breathing in terpenes increases anti-cancer proteins perforin, granulysin, and “granzymes,” which attack existing tumor cells and dangerous cells that may lead to cancer. Terpenes not only improve our immune system function but also protect us from heart attacks by increasing the body’s production of DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone), according to Japanese studies published in Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine. A Korean study also found a significant decrease in depression. Another Japanese study determined that terpenes distributed overnight through vaporizers in hotel rooms also had a therapeutic effect on the body’s immune system, although not to the same degree as exposure to the millions of terpenes in nature. The Ulrich study in Sweden and Denmark proved that seeing a tree through a hospital window shortened hospital stays and reduced complications and medication (including pain meds). The tree view activates the parasympathetic nervous system of regeneration and growth and the vagus nerve, causing balance and calm. Seeing a photograph or painting of nature or hearing the sounds of nature also have a calming effect that decreases the stress hormone cortisol in the blood. The opposite is true, as well. Stressful, noisy, city life switches our reptilian brains into fight or flight mode. Seeking out parks and pockets of nature in the city, growing potted trees, house plants, and rooftop gardens, are especially important to provide balance and relief. This connection between the psychological, physical, and ecological is a new science called ecopsychosomatics. It recognizes the human organism’s interconnectedness with the natural world. “Forest bathing,” which I introduced in Mountain Meditation last year, is an ancient Chinese healing art called “Senlinyu” that began 2,500 years ago with qi gong and tai chi, to heal and increase “chi” energy. In the 1980s, “Shinrin-yoku” was studied in Japan and has become a popular healing technique. Next week we’ll further explore ecopsychosomatics and the field of plant sociology, which includes the other main function of terpenes: to enable communication within and between communities of trees. Marguerite Jill Dye is an artist and writer who divides her time between Vermont and Florida’s Gulf Coast. BIOPHILIAMAGURITE JILL DYEMOUNTAIN MEDITATION SHARE THIS ARTICLE FacebookTweetGoogle +EmailLinkedInPinterestShareThis Leave a Reply Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Name * Email * Website KES sixth graders give new spin to Greek tragedy Three overlooked keys to successful investing SEARCH MOUNTAIN TIMES NEWSLETTER Sign up below to receive the weekly newsletter, which also includes top trending stories and what all the locals are talking about! Email Address MOST POPULAR NEWS BRIEFS News Briefs: Lakes Region 01 JULY, 2015NO COMMENTS SPORTS The 2014 Spartan Death Race takes endurance athletes on an “exploration” 14 JULY, 20141 COMMENT FEATURED Rutland group boycotts Mac’s, again: Unsafe work environments and mistreatment of employees is at the heart of the protest 13 AUGUST, 201427 COMMENTS STATE NEWS Lawmakers discuss cost, number of special ed teachers in Vermont 24 FEBRUARY, 2016NO COMMENTS LOCAL NEWS Rutland Regional Planning Commission names Edward Bove as new executive director 20 AUGUST, 2014NO COMMENTS MOUNTAIN TIMES TWITTER 15 days ago #killington Select Board just fired Town Manager without cause. /t.co/6kRQqQElKy 21 days ago RT @KillingtonMtn: Now you can send it into all four seasons with the NEW Beast 365 Year-Round Pass with convenient monthly payments of jus… 37 days ago RT @robmitch802: Pittsford 2-yr Select Board race ends with tie: Alicia Malay 181 – Susan Markowski 181 , per asst. town clerk #TMDVT 42 days ago RT @KillingtonMtn: What’s on tap at the @VermontBrewers Festival at Killington? Over 100 different breweries, featuring 31 different Vermon… CATEGORIES Arts, Dining & Entertainment AUDI FIS Ski World Cup Breaking News Ticker Column Editors Picks Events & Activities Explore Killington Featured From the Vault Getaways Horoscope Archives Killington Killington Signature Events Killington TV Lifestyle Lift Lines Archives Local News Mother’s celestial inspirations News Briefs Opinion Previous Edition Archive Show Segments Sports State News Uncategorized NAVIGATION Home Horoscopes Events Calendar Discover Killington Classifieds Opinion Column Lifestyle Contact Us About The Mountain Times FIND US ON FACEBOOK MOUNTAIN TIMES NEWSLETTER Sign up below to receive the weekly newsletter, which also includes top trending stories and what all the locals are talking about! Email Address ABOUT THE MOUNTAIN TIMES The Mountain Times is, and has always been, a family-owned independent newspaper located on Route 4. Founded in 1971, the paper has gone through many transitions, now expanding into web and mobile platforms in addition to its weekly newspaper and semi-annual magazines. – See more at: Here The Mountain Times PO Box 183 (Postal address) 5465 Route 4 (Physical address) Killington, VT 05751 Telephone: (802) 422-2399 Fax: (802) 422-2395 Copyright© The Mountain Times, All Rights Reserved. Website designed and built by Group6 Interactive APRIL 12, 2018 Biophilia : healing connection and love of nature Painting by Magurite Jill Dye by Magurite Jill Dye Vermonters and fellow nature lovers know the power our magnificent mountains, forests, and woods have on our wellbeing. If I hadn’t experienced nature’s healing effect myself, I may not have understood the forest’s curative energies on the human immune system. Years ago, after travels in Turkey and Greece, I arrived in Austria to attend a University of Graz summer program. Austria has always reminded me of Vermont, and Graz is the sister city of my hometown, Montclair, N.J. But I’d taken ill after Istanbul with a very sore throat, high fever, and chills. A kind young mother I met on the tram took me to her home for a traditional cure. After a nap and cups of hot tea, she led me outside into the cool forest. While she and her children picked wild blueberries, I rested under a pine tree. Little did I realize how quickly breathing in the moist forest air would help me heal and regain my strength. But the science became clear when I heard an interview on Sounds True (soundstrue.com) with Austrian biologist Clemens Arvay from the University of Graz. We are eco-psychosomatic beings, according to Arvay, author of “The Biophilia Effect: A Scientific and Spiritual Exploration of the Healing Bond Between Humans and Nature.” Biophilia is the love of and our interconnectedness with nature. In the 1960s, German-American psychoanalyst Eric Fromm wrote that humans have a biophilic force in our psyche that connects us with other species and creates a desire to be close to nature. He said that our biophilic force creates a flow that keeps us healthy, but when we are disconnected from nature, we become ill. Since then, Arvay said, much progress has been made in the field. In 2013, studies were published that measured the increase in human immune system function from breathing in terpenes in the forest air. Terpenes are the complex biochemical compounds that are released by trees and plants and that have a healing effect on the human body. They rise dramatically in April and May and peak in June and August. After spending just one day in a forest, the “natural killer cells” in a person’s blood increase by 40 percent and their activity increases too. They work to eliminate bacteria and viruses as an important part of the immune system. There is also evidence that breathing in terpenes increases anti-cancer proteins perforin, granulysin, and “granzymes,” which attack existing tumor cells and dangerous cells that may lead to cancer. Terpenes not only improve our immune system function but also protect us from heart attacks by increasing the body’s production of DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone), according to Japanese studies published in Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine. A Korean study also found a significant decrease in depression. Another Japanese study determined that terpenes distributed overnight through vaporizers in hotel rooms also had a therapeutic effect on the body’s immune system, although not to the same degree as exposure to the millions of terpenes in nature. The Ulrich study in Sweden and Denmark proved that seeing a tree through a hospital window shortened hospital stays and reduced complications and medication (including pain meds). The tree view activates the parasympathetic nervous system of regeneration and growth and the vagus nerve, causing balance and calm. Seeing a photograph or painting of nature or hearing the sounds of nature also have a calming effect that decreases the stress hormone cortisol in the blood. The opposite is true, as well. Stressful, noisy, city life switches our reptilian brains into fight or flight mode. Seeking out parks and pockets of nature in the city, growing potted trees, house plants, and rooftop gardens, are especially important to provide balance and relief. This connection between the psychological, physical, and ecological is a new science called ecopsychosomatics. It recognizes the human organism’s interconnectedness with the natural world. “Forest bathing,” which I introduced in Mountain Meditation last year, is an ancient Chinese healing art called “Senlinyu” that began 2,500 years ago with qi gong and tai chi, to heal and increase “chi” energy. In the 1980s, “Shinrin-yoku” was studied in Japan and has become a popular healing technique. Next week we’ll further explore ecopsychosomatics and the field of plant sociology, which includes the other main function of terpenes: to enable communication within and between communities of trees. Marguerite Jill Dye is an artist and writer who divides her time between Vermont and Florida’s Gulf Coast. BIOPHILIAMAGURITE JILL DYEMOUNTAIN MEDITATION SHARE THIS ARTICLE FacebookTweetGoogle +EmailLinkedInPinterestShareThis Leave a Reply Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Name * Email * Website KES sixth graders give new spin to Greek tragedy Three overlooked keys to successful investing SEARCH MOUNTAIN TIMES NEWSLETTER Sign up below to receive the weekly newsletter, which also includes top trending stories and what all the locals are talking about! Email Address MOST POPULAR NEWS BRIEFS News Briefs: Lakes Region 01 JULY, 2015NO COMMENTS SPORTS The 2014 Spartan Death Race takes endurance athletes on an “exploration” 14 JULY, 20141 COMMENT FEATURED Rutland group boycotts Mac’s, again: Unsafe work environments and mistreatment of employees is at the heart of the protest 13 AUGUST, 201427 COMMENTS STATE NEWS Lawmakers discuss cost, number of special ed teachers in Vermont 24 FEBRUARY, 2016NO COMMENTS LOCAL NEWS Rutland Regional Planning Commission names Edward Bove as new executive director 20 AUGUST, 2014NO COMMENTS MOUNTAIN TIMES TWITTER 15 days ago #killington Select Board just fired Town Manager without cause. /t.co/6kRQqQElKy 21 days ago RT @KillingtonMtn: Now you can send it into all four seasons with the NEW Beast 365 Year-Round Pass with convenient monthly payments of jus… 37 days ago RT @robmitch802: Pittsford 2-yr Select Board race ends with tie: Alicia Malay 181 – Susan Markowski 181 , per asst. town clerk #TMDVT 42 days ago RT @KillingtonMtn: What’s on tap at the @VermontBrewers Festival at Killington? Over 100 different breweries, featuring 31 different Vermon… CATEGORIES Arts, Dining & Entertainment AUDI FIS Ski World Cup Breaking News Ticker Column Editors Picks Events & Activities Explore Killington Featured From the Vault Getaways Horoscope Archives Killington Killington Signature Events Killington TV Lifestyle Lift Lines Archives Local News Mother’s celestial inspirations News Briefs Opinion Previous Edition Archive Show Segments Sports State News Uncategorized NAVIGATION Home Horoscopes Events Calendar Discover Killington Classifieds Opinion Column Lifestyle Contact Us About The Mountain Times FIND US ON FACEBOOK MOUNTAIN TIMES NEWSLETTER Sign up below to receive the weekly newsletter, which also includes top trending stories and what all the locals are talking about! Email Address ABOUT THE MOUNTAIN TIMES The Mountain Times is, and has always been, a family-owned independent newspaper located on Route 4. Founded in 1971, the paper has gone through many transitions, now expanding into web and mobile platforms in addition to its weekly newspaper and semi-annual magazines. – See more at: Here The Mountain Times PO Box 183 (Postal address) 5465 Route 4 (Physical address) Killington, VT 05751 Telephone: (802) 422-2399 Fax: (802) 422-2395 Copyright© The Mountain Times, All Rights Reserved. Website designed and built by Group6 Interactive ShareThis Copy and PasteFocus Retriever4 Shares4Focus Retriever4 Shares4

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