Kids Need Vitamin N

MOUNTAIN MEDITATION

APRIL 26, 2018

Kids need Vitamin N

By Marguerite Jill Dye

Climbing a tree is a path to self-discovery. Building a woodland fort is an exercise in creativity. Stepping across a babbling brook develops confidence and brings joy. Our most treasured childhood memories are often from outdoor adventures. While 71 percent of adults played outside as kids, only 21 percent of America’s children regularly play outdoors now. But a child’s time experiencing nature reaps an array of health benefits and provides a life long love, wonder, and awe for our natural world. Nature constantly calls to us in Vermont, where we’re certainly fortunate to be. Just opening the door and venturing outside gives us a dose of “Vitamin N”: Nature!

“Children will be smarter, better able to get along with others, healthier and happier when they have regular opportunities for free and unstructured play in the out-of-doors,” according to the American Medical Association. Even five minutes of “green exercise” improve self-esteem and mental well being, especially in the young. Outdoor free play reduces obesity, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and aggression. It boosts creativity, problem solving skills, and the ability to learn. It increases self-discipline and emotional and psychological well being. Who would have thought, a few years ago, we’d need a reminder that playing in nature promotes a child’s happiness?

“Within the space of a few decades, the way children understand and experience nature has changed radically,” Richard Louv wrote in his bestselling book, “Last Child in the Woods: Saving our Children from Nature Deficit Disorder.” He named the diagnosis that stems from the growing phenomenon. “Today, kids are aware of the global threats to the environment—but their physical contact, their intimacy with nature, is fading … As the young spend less and less of their lives in natural surroundings, their senses narrow, physiologically and psychologically, and this reduces the richness of human experience.”

“Within reasonable limits, children need the freedom to play how they choose, including taking risks,” according to Dr. Mariana Brussoni, a developmental child psychologist. “We are experiencing an unprecedented curtailing of children’s outdoor and risky play that is already impacting children’s health and development. It is up to all of us to help provide children the opportunity to develop those life lessons and skills that are so important in shaping their future; helping them develop a view of the world as a place of possibility, rather than of danger.” OutsidePlay.ca was especially created to help adults gain confidence and skills to let children play outdoors.

Over the last 20 years, children’s relationship with nature has changed dramatically due to the technology of “entertainment media,” organized “constructive” activities, traffic, and “stranger danger”—the fear of abduction. When children are constantly told to “Be careful!” or “Don’t do that!” parents’ and caregivers’ own fears may lead to excessive limitations and overprotection. These can contribute to a child’s lack of self-confidence and a fear of taking risks. According to a study reported in The Guardian, children’s health and development are being negatively affected because they are spending less time in nature in self-initiated, outdoor free play. British weather isn’t known for its sunshine, but 64 percent of Brittish kids played outside less than once a week, 28 percent hadn’t gone for a walk in the country for a year, 21 percent had never visited a farm, and 29 percent never climbed a tree. American kids also play inside more than outside, and much closer to home than they used to. In fact, more childhood accidents are from falls out of bed than from a tree, these days.

Marguerite Jill Dye is an artist and writer who divides her time between the Green Mountains of Vermont and Florida’s Gulf Coast.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.Required fields are marked *

Name *

Website

MOUNTAIN MEDITATION

APRIL 26, 2018

Kids need Vitamin N

By Marguerite Jill Dye

Climbing a tree is a path to self-discovery. Building a woodland fort is an exercise in creativity. Stepping across a babbling brook develops confidence and brings joy. Our most treasured childhood memories are often from outdoor adventures. While 71 percent of adults played outside as kids, only 21 percent of America’s children regularly play outdoors now. But a child’s time experiencing nature reaps an array of health benefits and provides a life long love, wonder, and awe for our natural world. Nature constantly calls to us in Vermont, where we’re certainly fortunate to be. Just opening the door and venturing outside gives us a dose of “Vitamin N”: Nature!

“Children will be smarter, better able to get along with others, healthier and happier when they have regular opportunities for free and unstructured play in the out-of-doors,” according to the American Medical Association. Even five minutes of “green exercise” improve self-esteem and mental well being, especially in the young. Outdoor free play reduces obesity, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and aggression. It boosts creativity, problem solving skills, and the ability to learn. It increases self-discipline and emotional and psychological well being. Who would have thought, a few years ago, we’d need a reminder that playing in nature promotes a child’s happiness?

“Within the space of a few decades, the way children understand and experience nature has changed radically,” Richard Louv wrote in his bestselling book, “Last Child in the Woods: Saving our Children from Nature Deficit Disorder.” He named the diagnosis that stems from the growing phenomenon. “Today, kids are aware of the global threats to the environment—but their physical contact, their intimacy with nature, is fading … As the young spend less and less of their lives in natural surroundings, their senses narrow, physiologically and psychologically, and this reduces the richness of human experience.”

“Within reasonable limits, children need the freedom to play how they choose, including taking risks,” according to Dr. Mariana Brussoni, a developmental child psychologist. “We are experiencing an unprecedented curtailing of children’s outdoor and risky play that is already impacting children’s health and development. It is up to all of us to help provide children the opportunity to develop those life lessons and skills that are so important in shaping their future; helping them develop a view of the world as a place of possibility, rather than of danger.” OutsidePlay.ca was especially created to help adults gain confidence and skills to let children play outdoors.

Over the last 20 years, children’s relationship with nature has changed dramatically due to the technology of “entertainment media,” organized “constructive” activities, traffic, and “stranger danger”—the fear of abduction. When children are constantly told to “Be careful!” or “Don’t do that!” parents’ and caregivers’ own fears may lead to excessive limitations and overprotection. These can contribute to a child’s lack of self-confidence and a fear of taking risks. According to a study reported in The Guardian, children’s health and development are being negatively affected because they are spending less time in nature in self-initiated, outdoor free play. British weather isn’t known for its sunshine, but 64 percent of Brittish kids played outside less than once a week, 28 percent hadn’t gone for a walk in the country for a year, 21 percent had never visited a farm, and 29 percent never climbed a tree. American kids also play inside more than outside, and much closer to home than they used to. In fact, more childhood accidents are from falls out of bed than from a tree, these days.

Marguerite Jill Dye is an artist and writer who divides her time between the Green Mountains of Vermont and Florida’s Gulf Coast.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Name *

Website

ShareThis Copy and Paste
Focus Retriever
4
Shares

Facebook4TwitterGoogle+

MOUNTAIN MEDITATION Home > Column > Mountain Meditation > Kids need Vitamin N APRIL 26, 2018 Kids need Vitamin N By Marguerite Jill Dye Climbing a tree is a path to self-discovery. Building a woodland fort is an exercise in creativity. Stepping across a babbling brook develops confidence and brings joy. Our most treasured childhood memories are often from outdoor adventures. While 71 percent of adults played outside as kids, only 21 percent of America’s children regularly play outdoors now. But a child’s time experiencing nature reaps an array of health benefits and provides a life long love, wonder, and awe for our natural world. Nature constantly calls to us in Vermont, where we’re certainly fortunate to be. Just opening the door and venturing outside gives us a dose of “Vitamin N”: Nature! “Children will be smarter, better able to get along with others, healthier and happier when they have regular opportunities for free and unstructured play in the out-of-doors,” according to the American Medical Association. Even five minutes of “green exercise” improve self-esteem and mental well being, especially in the young. Outdoor free play reduces obesity, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and aggression. It boosts creativity, problem solving skills, and the ability to learn. It increases self-discipline and emotional and psychological well being. Who would have thought, a few years ago, we’d need a reminder that playing in nature promotes a child’s happiness? “Within the space of a few decades, the way children understand and experience nature has changed radically,” Richard Louv wrote in his bestselling book, “Last Child in the Woods: Saving our Children from Nature Deficit Disorder.” He named the diagnosis that stems from the growing phenomenon. “Today, kids are aware of the global threats to the environment—but their physical contact, their intimacy with nature, is fading … As the young spend less and less of their lives in natural surroundings, their senses narrow, physiologically and psychologically, and this reduces the richness of human experience.” “Within reasonable limits, children need the freedom to play how they choose, including taking risks,” according to Dr. Mariana Brussoni, a developmental child psychologist. “We are experiencing an unprecedented curtailing of children’s outdoor and risky play that is already impacting children’s health and development. It is up to all of us to help provide children the opportunity to develop those life lessons and skills that are so important in shaping their future; helping them develop a view of the world as a place of possibility, rather than of danger.” OutsidePlay.ca was especially created to help adults gain confidence and skills to let children play outdoors. Over the last 20 years, children’s relationship with nature has changed dramatically due to the technology of “entertainment media,” organized “constructive” activities, traffic, and “stranger danger”—the fear of abduction. When children are constantly told to “Be careful!” or “Don’t do that!” parents’ and caregivers’ own fears may lead to excessive limitations and overprotection. These can contribute to a child’s lack of self-confidence and a fear of taking risks. According to a study reported in The Guardian, children’s health and development are being negatively affected because they are spending less time in nature in self-initiated, outdoor free play. British weather isn’t known for its sunshine, but 64 percent of Brittish kids played outside less than once a week, 28 percent hadn’t gone for a walk in the country for a year, 21 percent had never visited a farm, and 29 percent never climbed a tree. American kids also play inside more than outside, and much closer to home than they used to. In fact, more childhood accidents are from falls out of bed than from a tree, these days. Marguerite Jill Dye is an artist and writer who divides her time between the Green Mountains of Vermont and Florida’s Gulf Coast. CHILDRENKIDSMARGUERITE JILL DYENATUREVITAMIN N SHARE THIS ARTICLE FacebookTweetGoogle +EmailLinkedInPinterestShareThis Leave a Reply Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Name * Email * Website Bluegrass and Latin music up next in Chandler’s “Live & Upstairs“ series Playing outdoors in the 1950s SEARCH MOUNTAIN TIMES NEWSLETTER Sign up below to receive the weekly newsletter, which also includes top trending stories and what all the locals are talking about! Email Address MOST POPULAR NEWS BRIEFS News Briefs: Lakes Region 01 JULY, 2015NO COMMENTS SPORTS The 2014 Spartan Death Race takes endurance athletes on an “exploration” 14 JULY, 20143 COMMENTS FEATURED Rutland group boycotts Mac’s, again: Unsafe work environments and mistreatment of employees is at the heart of the protest 13 AUGUST, 201427 COMMENTS STATE NEWS Lawmakers discuss cost, number of special ed teachers in Vermont 24 FEBRUARY, 2016NO COMMENTS LOCAL NEWS Rutland Regional Planning Commission names Edward Bove as new executive director 20 AUGUST, 2014NO COMMENTS MOUNTAIN TIMES TWITTER 5 days ago Spring party @KillingtonMtn #beast365 @musicofmadaila is rocking the stage! /t.co/ThxyawPQoy 9 days ago Horoscopes for April 18th-24th, 2018 – *|/t.co/uLjAq9IZUS|* /t.co/67skx4C2Pc 9 days ago #Killington town Select Board voted in favor of loaning the golf pro shop @GMNGC $250k to start up season. 9 days ago #killington Select Board voted to contract with Brown Golf Management to manage @GMNGC all 3 board members approved. CATEGORIES Arts, Dining & Entertainment AUDI FIS Ski World Cup Breaking News Ticker Column Editors Picks Events & Activities Explore Killington Featured From the Vault Getaways Horoscope Archives Killington Killington Signature Events Killington TV Lifestyle Lift Lines Archives Local News Mother’s celestial inspirations News Briefs Opinion Previous Edition Archive Show Segments Sports State News Uncategorized NAVIGATION Home Horoscopes Events Calendar Discover Killington Classifieds Opinion Column Lifestyle Contact Us About The Mountain Times FIND US ON FACEBOOK MOUNTAIN TIMES NEWSLETTER Sign up below to receive the weekly newsletter, which also includes top trending stories and what all the locals are talking about! Email Address ABOUT THE MOUNTAIN TIMES The Mountain Times is, and has always been, a family-owned independent newspaper located on Route 4. Founded in 1971, the paper has gone through many transitions, now expanding into web and mobile platforms in addition to its weekly newspaper and semi-annual magazines. – See more at: Here The Mountain Times PO Box 183 (Postal address) 5465 Route 4 (Physical address) Killington, VT 05751 Telephone: (802) 422-2399 Fax: (802) 422-2395 Copyright© The Mountain Times, All Rights Reserved. Website designed and built by Group6 Interactive MOUNTAIN MEDITATION Home > Column > Mountain Meditation > Kids need Vitamin N APRIL 26, 2018 Kids need Vitamin N By Marguerite Jill Dye Climbing a tree is a path to self-discovery. Building a woodland fort is an exercise in creativity. Stepping across a babbling brook develops confidence and brings joy. Our most treasured childhood memories are often from outdoor adventures. While 71 percent of adults played outside as kids, only 21 percent of America’s children regularly play outdoors now. But a child’s time experiencing nature reaps an array of health benefits and provides a life long love, wonder, and awe for our natural world. Nature constantly calls to us in Vermont, where we’re certainly fortunate to be. Just opening the door and venturing outside gives us a dose of “Vitamin N”: Nature! “Children will be smarter, better able to get along with others, healthier and happier when they have regular opportunities for free and unstructured play in the out-of-doors,” according to the American Medical Association. Even five minutes of “green exercise” improve self-esteem and mental well being, especially in the young. Outdoor free play reduces obesity, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and aggression. It boosts creativity, problem solving skills, and the ability to learn. It increases self-discipline and emotional and psychological well being. Who would have thought, a few years ago, we’d need a reminder that playing in nature promotes a child’s happiness? “Within the space of a few decades, the way children understand and experience nature has changed radically,” Richard Louv wrote in his bestselling book, “Last Child in the Woods: Saving our Children from Nature Deficit Disorder.” He named the diagnosis that stems from the growing phenomenon. “Today, kids are aware of the global threats to the environment—but their physical contact, their intimacy with nature, is fading … As the young spend less and less of their lives in natural surroundings, their senses narrow, physiologically and psychologically, and this reduces the richness of human experience.” “Within reasonable limits, children need the freedom to play how they choose, including taking risks,” according to Dr. Mariana Brussoni, a developmental child psychologist. “We are experiencing an unprecedented curtailing of children’s outdoor and risky play that is already impacting children’s health and development. It is up to all of us to help provide children the opportunity to develop those life lessons and skills that are so important in shaping their future; helping them develop a view of the world as a place of possibility, rather than of danger.” OutsidePlay.ca was especially created to help adults gain confidence and skills to let children play outdoors. Over the last 20 years, children’s relationship with nature has changed dramatically due to the technology of “entertainment media,” organized “constructive” activities, traffic, and “stranger danger”—the fear of abduction. When children are constantly told to “Be careful!” or “Don’t do that!” parents’ and caregivers’ own fears may lead to excessive limitations and overprotection. These can contribute to a child’s lack of self-confidence and a fear of taking risks. According to a study reported in The Guardian, children’s health and development are being negatively affected because they are spending less time in nature in self-initiated, outdoor free play. British weather isn’t known for its sunshine, but 64 percent of Brittish kids played outside less than once a week, 28 percent hadn’t gone for a walk in the country for a year, 21 percent had never visited a farm, and 29 percent never climbed a tree. American kids also play inside more than outside, and much closer to home than they used to. In fact, more childhood accidents are from falls out of bed than from a tree, these days. Marguerite Jill Dye is an artist and writer who divides her time between the Green Mountains of Vermont and Florida’s Gulf Coast. CHILDRENKIDSMARGUERITE JILL DYENATUREVITAMIN N SHARE THIS ARTICLE FacebookTweetGoogle +EmailLinkedInPinterestShareThis Leave a Reply Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Name * Email * Website Bluegrass and Latin music up next in Chandler’s “Live & Upstairs“ series Playing outdoors in the 1950s SEARCH MOUNTAIN TIMES NEWSLETTER Sign up below to receive the weekly newsletter, which also includes top trending stories and what all the locals are talking about! Email Address MOST POPULAR NEWS BRIEFS News Briefs: Lakes Region 01 JULY, 2015NO COMMENTS SPORTS The 2014 Spartan Death Race takes endurance athletes on an “exploration” 14 JULY, 20143 COMMENTS FEATURED Rutland group boycotts Mac’s, again: Unsafe work environments and mistreatment of employees is at the heart of the protest 13 AUGUST, 201427 COMMENTS STATE NEWS Lawmakers discuss cost, number of special ed teachers in Vermont 24 FEBRUARY, 2016NO COMMENTS LOCAL NEWS Rutland Regional Planning Commission names Edward Bove as new executive director 20 AUGUST, 2014NO COMMENTS MOUNTAIN TIMES TWITTER 5 days ago Spring party @KillingtonMtn #beast365 @musicofmadaila is rocking the stage! /t.co/ThxyawPQoy 9 days ago Horoscopes for April 18th-24th, 2018 – *|/t.co/uLjAq9IZUS|* /t.co/67skx4C2Pc 9 days ago #Killington town Select Board voted in favor of loaning the golf pro shop @GMNGC $250k to start up season. 9 days ago #killington Select Board voted to contract with Brown Golf Management to manage @GMNGC all 3 board members approved. CATEGORIES Arts, Dining & Entertainment AUDI FIS Ski World Cup Breaking News Ticker Column Editors Picks Events & Activities Explore Killington Featured From the Vault Getaways Horoscope Archives Killington Killington Signature Events Killington TV Lifestyle Lift Lines Archives Local News Mother’s celestial inspirations News Briefs Opinion Previous Edition Archive Show Segments Sports State News Uncategorized NAVIGATION Home Horoscopes Events Calendar Discover Killington Classifieds Opinion Column Lifestyle Contact Us About The Mountain Times FIND US ON FACEBOOK MOUNTAIN TIMES NEWSLETTER Sign up below to receive the weekly newsletter, which also includes top trending stories and what all the locals are talking about! Email Address ABOUT THE MOUNTAIN TIMES The Mountain Times is, and has always been, a family-owned independent newspaper located on Route 4. Founded in 1971, the paper has gone through many transitions, now expanding into web and mobile platforms in addition to its weekly newspaper and semi-annual magazines. – See more at: Here The Mountain Times PO Box 183 (Postal address) 5465 Route 4 (Physical address) Killington, VT 05751 Telephone: (802) 422-2399 Fax: (802) 422-2395 Copyright© The Mountain Times, All Rights Reserved. Website designed and built by Group6 Interactive ShareThis Copy and PasteFocus Retriever4 Shares4Focus Retriever4 Shares4

Focus Retriever
4
Shares

Facebook4TwitterGoogle+

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: